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WHERE'S THE DRAMA?

The stuff that dreams are made of

T H I S  I S  IT !

 

THE FILM SCHOOL THAT'S A PRODUCTION STUDIO 

ON-THE-JOB LEARNING LEADING TO AN 

ADVANCED DIPLOMA IN SCREEN & MEDIA 

There is no other film school in Australia like it, perhaps no other film school like it anywhere in the world. SIFA (short for Sydney Institute Film Academy) offers an inspiring year-long, full-time production studio experience where student filmmakers learns on-the-job, not in a classroom. "You learn film-making by making films, all the time,"  is one of SIFA's guiding principles.

Whether you're writing scripts, in pre-production, shooting a feature, cutting a documentary, or marketing the 'sleeper' hit feature of the year, it's all about giving you continuous hands-on experience, working with some of the most extraordinary mentors/programme makers you'll ever encounter.

At SIFA the learning is REAL and always relevant to the tasks at hand - and it's happening all the time. At SIFA everyone's a filmmaker/learner, working on dramatic stories for film, TV and digital media. At SIFA, the creative challenges are matched by a supportive and constructive team of experienced mentors, encouraging you to develop and refine your screen storytelling skills whilst working as part of an energetic production team making and marketing a slate that can include anything from long-form dramas, feature documentaries & television drama & comedy series to trailers & music video clips with tie-ins to the features on the production slate.

Why not join the Revolution? 

DETAILS HERE

 

WANNA TEST DRIVE YOUR STORY FOR FREE?  WHY NOT TRY... 

 

10 sessions over 10 weeks, AT NO COST !

Commences first week of September, 2016  -  First come, first served.

DETAILS HERE 

  

 

 

An 8-minute MASTER CLASS in the grammar of dramatic storytelling

Courtesy of Chuck Jones 

____________________________________

 "If you have a leap of faith that is underpowered where you're questioning it as you leap, you don't get to the other side. You can't leap without complete and absolute willingness to die for your want."

                                                            ~ Bruce Joel Rubin

 
 
WRITE THE SCRIPT - GO ON THE JOURNEY
 
 
PLEASE REPORT BROKEN LINKS to stonekingseminars@hotmail.com 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
STONEKING ON FILMMAKING & GAYBY BABY 
 
Everything is a story we tell ourselves about who and what we are, and who and what everyone else is, and what we want and why we want it, and what we must do, and what we ought to do, and why we ought to do it, and who or what is interfering with our plans or needs and why. Each of us has a story, or many stories, and each of us is part of the stories of others to a greater or lesser degree.

In our story, we are invariably the leading character, the hero or anti-hero or heroine  in the life-and-death narrative we play out emotionally and intellectually through our behaviours and languages. If there are problems, they aren't necessarily because we have erected ourselves as the central character in our story, as it is because we are unwilling to embrace the possibility that, at its source, our story is an inspired collaboration that has no meaning apart from our relationships.

To work as a medium, channeling characters and stories, is to immerse oneself in a "show" that appears as if it is being performed by some thing other than yourself. To assent to this metaphor of showing is to acknowledge that there's no better way of entering a story other than surrendering to it, and allowing it to enter you - a condition and quality of creative openness. When this happens, the usual demarcations that separate the dreamer from the dream are erased. In jettisoning the ego-centric "SELF that creates" - the grand puppeteer - we surrender our need to manipulate and judge, and allow ourselves to be audience and witnesses to the story told or enacted by the characters that are becoming present in us and through us.  

   W E L C O M E   T O   T H E   D R A M A  !

The most relevant and enduring questions in the evolution and evaluation of screen-stories-that-matter are WHERE'S THE DRAMA? and WHY DO I CARE?  Simple questions you say, and yet the creation of fresh, surprising and compelling screen narratives is uncommon. Why is this? And what can be done about it? 

Industry and non-industry film and program makers, film audiences, students, reviewers and critics are invited to join Billy Marshall Stoneking and Stoneking Seminars in this unique, online investigation into the nature and character of dramatic, screen storytelling. 

Discover and explore the world of the character-driven story, as channeled by the storyteller working as a medium. Share your opinions and ideas, your insights and 'imaginary solutions'.  Spread the word!

Enter the Drama by selecting a topic from the MENU at the top of this page - or by using the search function provided BELOW to find exactly what you're looking for.

                                       + The Editor  

 

 CLICK ON MYSTERY LINK WHEREVER YOU SEE IT

 

Search "WHERE'S THE DRAMA?" & Stoneking's other site, "I HAVE NOTHING TO SAY & I'M SAYING IT"

STONEKING SEZ...

Most screenplays, at least in the early drafts, are built on cliches. The cliche is the broadest possible stroke of emotion, the familiar approximation that indicates some semblance of meaning. But it is stale, hackneyed and ultimately impotent. What the screenwriter must do is recognize the cliches and then have the guts and talent to transform them, which means disfiguring with it, damaging them, roughing them up, not for the sake of making a better cliche, but to prove to oneself that they have no power over you, and that you will not be a slave to them or allow their covert bullying. A damaged cliche can be very seductive, of course. It may even seem a useful option if you're writing bad melodrama or satire, but really, what you must strive for, and ultimately achieve, is your liberation from cliches altogether.
Most screenplays, at least in the early drafts, are built on cliches. The cliche is the broadest possible stroke of emotion, the familiar approximation that indicates some semblance of meaning. But it is stale, hackneyed and ultimately impotent. What the screenwriter must do is recognize the cliches and then have the guts and talent to transform them, which means disfiguring with it, damaging them, roughing them up, not for the sake of making a better cliche, but to prove to oneself that they have no power over you, and that you will not be a slave to them or allow their covert bullying. A damaged cliche can be very seductive, of course. It may even seem a useful option if you're writing bad melodrama or satire, but really, what you must strive for, and ultimately achieve, is your liberation from cliches altogether.
Most screenplays, at least in the early drafts, are built on cliches. The cliche is the broadest possible stroke of emotion, the familiar approximation that indicates some semblance of meaning. But it is stale, hackneyed and ultimately impotent. What the screenwriter must do is recognize the cliches and then have the guts and talent to transform them, which means disfiguring with it, damaging them, roughing them up, not for the sake of making a better cliche, but to prove to oneself that they have no power over you, and that you will not be a slave to them or allow their covert bullying. A damaged cliche can be very seductive, of course. It may even seem a useful option if you're writing bad melodrama or satire, but really, what you must strive for, and ultimately achieve, is your liberation from cliches altogether.

Our task as storytellers - dramatic storytellers - is to present as honestly as possible the nature of lived, human experience, revealing its challenges, difficulties, and those elemental anxieties that are constantly disturbing our hopes for a safe and comfortable world. The territory of our most compelling and transformative stories has always been the valley of the shadow of death, of guilt, of doubt, of meaningless. And if the stories we write or stage or film ignore or falsify that territory, we do our audience a grave injustice. If we cannot experience the suffering and the passion of what it means to be human in the stories we tell, what are they good for? - if not to build hope and courage, if not to remind us that characters - like us - have the strength to struggle and endure. And even if, ultimately, they are defeated, we can still admire the nerve with which they rose to the occasion.

 

 

THE MEANS IS FILM

THE MEDIUM IS

THE FILMMAKER

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Change is almost always frightening because its outcomes are usually unpredictable, and because characters frequently equate change with loss. Dramatic characters navigate this human predilection of fearing change by actively and persuasively pursuing needs and goals with which an audience can readily identify. By virtue of emotional identification, an audience becomes a participant in the evolving story of change.

http://www.wheresthedrama.com/resonances2.htm

 

 
 
 

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